Culture, Design, Economy, Education, Publicness, Social, The Netherlnads, The UK, Streetlife

Studying Streetlife from The Netherlands to the United Kingdom

I am taking on a new role within the Architectural field, in a broad sense switching from being a designer of large plans to an advisor of the small parts that make up that plan. Focusing specifically on urban public space, in which over 50% of the world's’ inhabitants now live around but become far and fewer in between towering glass shards, and fighting for light amongst mixed-use blocks.

My role is Architectural Advisor within a small Dutch industrial design studio based in Leiden, half an hour South of Amsterdam. They engineer elements (sort of lego blocks) that encourage green and rest to be accommodated in a diverse range of urban settings for the Architectural market to utilise in the design public spaces. Their clear design principles and persistence for sustainable and high quality products caught my interest - get the small things right and the bigger things have potential to be brilliant. They already have an impressive portfolio, collaborating with Architects in the design of furniture and forms for projects such as the High Line in New York with James Corner, the Olympic Park with LDA in London. I will be doing some intensive Streetlife training before leading the UK market, and regaining firsthand insight into UK building procuration methods after four years of living in the Netherlands. Day-to-day I will be based in the Netherlands, and monthly visiting our clients (City Councils, Landscape Architects and Architects); to discuss more specific details person-to-person, observe and analyse the effectiveness of the procuration processes we are involved in and hopefully contribute to realisation of some beautiful urban public spaces.

Always at the back of my mind is my Architectural thesis on the development and demolition decision of the Red Road area in Glasgow - what to do is still unresolved. It was one of many examples in 1960s Europe where local amenities and public space were cut out of the development budget resulting in generations of troubled neighbourhoods, unprecedented levels of crime, drug abuse and eventual desolation. The influence of public space in a project's success, a city's economic gains and an individual's safety and mental health has been proven crucial from this experimental period. Therefore I’ve decided to document my experiences within this new role, because on a whole I don’t think city development is given enough coverage or criticism..or at least not before it’s too late